7 Sun-loving Perennials for a Pollinator Garden

A pollinator garden uses specific plants to draw pollinators-like bees, wasps, butterflies, and hummingbirds to a specific area.

My 7 favorites for full sun beauty, and pollinator draw in my garden are:

1. Echinacea

This simple Southeastern native Purple Coneflower is one of my all time faves. It keeps the bees very happy, and a smile on my face all summer.

Bee & Echinacea

Pollinator planting is especially useful for me because I also grow vegetables in my raised beds, and the nearby pollinator garden helps draw more pollinators to my veggie blooms-therefore increasing my yields! I also try to pick plants that have beautiful blooms, or are Georgia native plants, or both.

2. Buddleia

Butterfly Bush-not to be confused with Butterfly Weed a native plant, is not a native plant & some people are very against the use of this plant at all. But I think one is ok, as long as you mix them with other native perennials the pollinators can also enjoy.

This variety, ‘Buzz Magenta’ is a dwarf, compact variety that doesn’t take over your whole yard, and the butterflies love it.

3. Agastache

One of my favorite new herbs, and therefore found all over my garden is the deer proof wonder Anise Hyssop. Delightful, long blooming, anise scented leaves, and pollinators all year make this a superstar favorite.

4. Lantana

‘Sonset’ Lantana oozes summer heat & the colors cant be beat. I bought three of these native, gorgeous, drought tolerant, pollinator magnets while working at Cofer’s last year, and they are one of my favorite plants, ever.

There are a very small lantana-unlike that ‘Miss Huff’ showoff. These are 3-4 feet max and stay smaller if keep minimally pruned. Their flower color changes throughout the day, from emerging morning yellow, to evening petals featuring more orange and supposedly pink hues, but I’ve never seen pink on mine just orange and yellow?

5. Gallardia

Another beautiful US native plant. These blooming beauties are very charming, and bloom profusely all season, especially if deadheaded from time to time.

6. Goldsturm Rudbekia

This Goldsturm variety is spectacular. It is blooms everywhere. I am impressed with its growth and spread in just one year. A beautiful plant that needs little maintenance and will fill an area with light and pollinators.

7. Abelia

Finishing off this pollinator plant list is one of my few shrubs that is a huge pollinator draw. This ‘Edward Goucher’ pink blooming Abelia variety is always humming with bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and others all season long, from first blooms in May until chilly fall nights.

E. Goucher Abelia, Echinacea Purpurea, Blue Eyed Grass, Nelly Moser Clematis, Peppermint, Gallardia

With a delicious honeysuckle smell (same family), it makes sense how much activity happens here. This one over is 8 feet tall, but newer varieties are much smaller and are more compact like ‘Kaleidoscope’. Most other varieties are white blooming.

Check out this fantastic resource from USDA US Forest Services web publication.

“Gardening for Pollinators”

Happy Gardening!

Landscape Perennials for Spring Blooms

My favorite Spring blooming plants from March & April include a few old favorites, and some new plants. I work at Cofer’s now, and I haven’t had much time to write, but will soon. My next post will be about the fifth year of raised bed garden planting-which I finally got done this past week.

Early March Bulbs sleep all winter & then awaken to Spring Sunshine

Link to Daff Seek There are like 30,000 cultivars!

Late March-Early April Shrubs, Perennials, & Vines

mid April Link to Iris Mythology

late April After studying her reflection Nature improves upon her artwork

Wow! So much happens in the garden in those few months.

Link to Landscape Perennials Native & Non publications.

The blooming is over now, but the plants live on growing & storing energy for more blooms.

Georgia Trees & Shrubs – Pruning & Maintenance 2018

Crabapple –

My husband & I pruned heavily with the new polesaw, in Spring 2017. The Crabapple has filled out beautifully since the great pruning, and the smaller size and shaping fits the front of the house much better. 

I identified this crabapple tree as a Centurion variety. Thanks mostly to the Colorado State University Extension Crabapple Identification page & Southern Living. I also looked at pics online. I didn’t know there are so many different varieties.

Abelia- 

Prune twice per year. First prune heavily in early Spring & then again in late Summer if necessary to shape prune. They smell so good, probably due to being related to honeysuckle. I love, love this shrub. Blooms from May til frost!

Dave’s Garden gives more details about this gorgeous plant.

Gardenia-

Only bloom on Old Wood, so I usually prune lightly in the Spring before blooms emerge in May. I don’t have the heart to cut the beautiful, fragrant flowers while they are open. I prune after it blooms, if not before.

Gardenia

I pruned the huge gardenia last week finally -early May 2018. See pic below. No blooms yet, and lots of fill in growing to do this season. It will help stimulate new growth and make a healthier shrub in the future.

Zone 7b, Georgia, Gardenia
After the great pruning. Looks a little sparse, but will fill in.

Loropetalum-

I prune every few years as needed in the early Spring. I pruned heavily in early March of 2018, but it is still very big, and has crossing branches. This shrub needs a major cut back again either later this year or next spring, maybe both.

Loropetalum March 2018 Before pruning, currently blooming

This post by Walter Reeves on pruning Loropetalum makes me laugh about the “needs little pruning” statement. Mine always has a natural look, especially now immediately after pruning, but I would like a more rounded appearance eventually.

Tools used: Long Pole Saw, Long Handled Loppers, Hedge Trimmers, Greenworks Chainsaw- this is new, and awesome. Quiet & No Gas & Powerful.

2018 Delaware Valley White Azalea. Not a native azalea, but beautiful!

I didn’t prune this azalea this year, but included it because it was spectacular this Spring. I will posts pics and details soon about all the great Native Plants I have planted in my landscape the last few years, like the Native Azaleas & Oakleaf Hydrangea. I love the Georgia Native Plant Society’s website for information on Georgia Native Plants. Also Raised Beds, Seeds, and 2018 Garden post to follow soon!